What is Aquarian Age Wicca?

“When I walked into my very first coven meeting of the Philadelphia coven, run by Elder High Priestess Aurora Raven, the very first thing she did was hand me a copy of the Wiccan Rede. It was a defining moment for me as a Wiccan, as it was then, standing amongst all the other students that I realized I was no longer a solitary eclectic witch, but I was now a student of a long-standing tradition that I hoped to be initiated into.” -High Priestess Aracelie (Initiated Beltane 2013)

The Aquarian Age Wiccan Tradition, named such in 2015, is a branch-off of an Algard Based Tradition from the 90’s in Maryland. From Maryland, we trace our line to Philadelphia (Philly Coven ran from 2010-2014 and then it dissolved) , and in 2013 an initiated student from Philadelphia moved to Texas taking the lineage with her, this was where Aquarian Age Wicca’s name was founded. We still hold the traditions of our former line, we have simply decided to rebrand and rename the tradition, making a few inclusive changes to accommodate the shifting tides of the Age of Aquarius. (Read more about these changes made to the tradition at the bottom of this page)

What are the beliefs of the Aquarian Age Wiccan Tradition?
To start off, we believe in many of the general fundamental beliefs of Wicca. Wicca is first and foremost a religion, and witchcraft is just one part of it. We follow the Wiccan Rede, believe in “Harm None, ” and trust in the Threefold law. We believe in a Goddess and God, and as a coven, we view them simply as the male and female ruling powers of the universe. We do not focus on a specific pantheon. Something that may be different about our coven to other types of Wicca or Paganism is that we do not put much focus on researching goddess and gods, specifically because we believe in letting the divine approach us naturally through their own messages. We strongly believe in helping the environment. We hold community service days to pick up trash, and many (but not all) of our members are vegan or vegetarian.

Inspiration for the name of our coven is derived from page 218 of Doreen Valiente’s book, The Rebirth of Witchcraft. Valiente writes, “We live in a different world today from that in which our ancestors who formed old covens lived.” “[The new Religion] will be a happy, constructive religion…it will be in communication with Mother Earth and with the changing seasons and the elements of life. It will take its stand against greed, cruelty and social injustice…[It will have] quiet times of meditation and healing for mind and body….It will be part of the Aquarian Age”

Our coven is a safe space where like-minded individuals come together to worship the goddess and the god, and we strive to educate, grow, and empower practitioners to be the best Wiccans they can be.

Changes we have made in the coven to accommodate the shifting tides of the New Age:
We still very much honor our initiation rules from our lineage, however, one change we made from the old ways when establishing ourselves under the name Aquarian Age Wicca, is that we believe both men and women are equal, and either sex may lead a circle solitarily, or in a pair. For example, in *some* circles of traditional Wicca, two priests or one priest may never lead a circle; a priestess must always be present. These rules excluding men are still present in many Wiccan circles of different traditions. We have decided to pull away from that, because we believe balance and equality is important.
Additionally, in AAW we respect coven member’s gender identity. If you want to be initiated as a priest instead of a priestess, or a priestess instead of a priest, we will respect that no matter what.
Unlike some older traditions, there is no “great rite” (intercourse in circle) for initiation in Aquarian Age Wicca. Additionally, no ritual nudity is required for this tradition.

“When I walked into my very first coven meeting of the Philadelphia coven, run by Elder High Priestess Aurora Raven, the very first thing she did was hand me a copy of the Wiccan Rede. It was a defining moment for me as a Wiccan, as it was then, standing amongst all the other students that I realized I was no longer a solitary eclectic witch, but I was now a student of a long-standing tradition that I hoped to be initiated into.” -High Priestess Aracelie (Initiated Beltane 2013)